Getting Xamarin.Forms apps working with .NET Standard and Roslyn

Recently, I was trying to write a Xamarin.Forms app that uses Roslyn, Microsoft’s NET languages compiler framework. But, no matter what I did, it seemed as though it wasn’t possible. But, I tried a few things, and noticed that the Roslyn library could link with Android and iOS applications. That’s when I realized it might be possible. That said, it depends on what you will … Continue reading Getting Xamarin.Forms apps working with .NET Standard and Roslyn

Cross-Debugging Mono C# Executables Running on Linux

Debugging C# programs that run on a Linux server can be a challenge. On Ubuntu, a server may not have the Unity GUI installed, so you can’t use MonoDevelop. Even if the server had the GUI, MonoDevelop often does not work with a C# project because it doesn’t support many Visual Studio 2015 projects. Visual Studio supposedly can cross-debug a program running on Linux from a Windows box, but I … Continue reading Cross-Debugging Mono C# Executables Running on Linux

Getting a C# Server Working with Dokku and Vagrant

Developing a self-hosted web server in C# to run on Linux is like solo climbing a mountain: not a lot of people will be accompanying you; and the route will be unmarked, unmaintained, and often dangerous. In the digital world, there are two groups of programmers: people who use Node.js, Java, Ruby, etc. hosted on Linux; and people who use C# hosted on Windows. Building … Continue reading Getting a C# Server Working with Dokku and Vagrant

A Short, Practical Review of Foreign Function Calls in Java, C#, C++

Android is a popular platform for smartphones, with ten of thousands of applications developed for it every year. For coding an Android app, there are a number of programming languages, but Java is the most popular. However, Xamarin provides tools for writing applications in C# if you prefer. If you use Xamarin, but sometimes want to use an open-source library written in Java, you still can. The state of currently used, practical Foreign Function Interfaces (FFI) on most platforms is similar. Of course, the difficulty is in the details.

Generally, there are two ways for code in one language to call another: use a native function to call the foreign function; or, use reflection to call the foreign function. A bindings interface offers native functions to the whole foreign API.

Java Native Interface (JNI) provides a native interface to call non-Java code from Java. It also provides an API for use in C++ to invoke Java code, structured like Java’s reflection API.

There are a number of tutorials on how to use JNI, but they are somewhat out of date. This article brings it forward–if only to a small degree, with “how to” explanations.

Continue reading “A Short, Practical Review of Foreign Function Calls in Java, C#, C++”